The Limits of Religious Thought Examined in Eight Lectures, Preached before the University of Oxford, in the Year M.DCCC.LVIII. on the Foundation of the Late Rev. John Bampton

By Henry Longueville Mansel | Go to book overview

LECTURE VI.

FOR WHAT MAN KNOWETH THE THINGS OF A MAN, SAVE THE SPIRIT OF MAN WHICH IS IN HIM? EVEN SO THE THNGS OF GOD KNOWETH NO MAN, BUT THE SPIRIT OF GOD. --1 CORINTHIANS 11.11.

The conclusion to be drawn from our previous inquiries is, that the doctrines of Revealed Religion, like all other objects of human thought, have a relation to the constitution of the thinker to whom they are addressed; within which relation their practical application and significance is confined. At the same time, this very relation indicates the existence of ,a higher form of the same truths, beyond the range of human intelligence, and therefore not capable of representation in any positive mode of thought. Religious ideas, in short, like all other objects of man's consciousness, are composed of two distinct elements, -- a Matter, furnished from without, and a Form, imposed from within by the laws of the mind itself. The latter element is common to all objects of thought as such: the former is the peculiar and distinguishing feature, by which the doctrines of Revelation are distinguished from other religious representations, derived from natural sources; or by which, in more remote comparison, religious ideas in gen-

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The Limits of Religious Thought Examined in Eight Lectures, Preached before the University of Oxford, in the Year M.DCCC.LVIII. on the Foundation of the Late Rev. John Bampton
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Extract From The Last Will and Testament Of The Rev. John Bampton, Canon of Salisbury. V
  • Publishers' Advertisement - T0 The American Edition. VII
  • P R E F a C E - To The Third Edition. 9
  • Contents 35
  • Lecture I. 45
  • Lecture Ii. 68
  • Lecture Iii. 91
  • Lecture Iv. 114
  • Lecture V. 136
  • Lecture Vi. 158
  • Lecture Vii. 182
  • Lecture Viii. 204
  • Notes. 229
  • Index of Authors. 363
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