The New Elite in Post-Communist Eastern Europe

By Vladimir Shlapentokh; Christopher Vanderpool et al. | Go to book overview

6
Typology of the Modern Byelorussian Elite

Vladimir Snapkovskii

The social-political ideology of the former USSR did not accept or use a concept of "elite" with reference to the structure of Soviet society. Consequently, scientific analysis of the elite was not conducted. This is also the case for the social sciences in Byelarus, where the understanding of problems related to the modern Byelorussian elite remain undeveloped. Only a limited amount of data on the elite has been collected.

Most of the research on the Byelorussian elite has been collected by foreign "Byelorussologists." For example, the serious monograph An Algebra of Soviet Power by American social scientist Michael Urban was published at the end of the 1980s. Urban studied the party-state ruling clique of the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic in the period following World War II.1 The mechanism for selecting the managerial staff is examined and influential party clans are identified: Vitebsk, "partisan Brest," and Gomel. The first two groups possessed political force in the 1960s and 1970s and later supervised the republic in the 1980s.

The formation of an elite group is generally a lengthy process of selecting the best representatives from a social or ethnic group. The Byelorussian national elite began to form at the beginning of the twentieth century in an epoch of national revival. Most came as the representatives of the small and average Byelorussian gentry (shlakhta) and the nobility. Those who came from these strata, along with the national intelligentsia of peasant origin, headed the Byelorussian nation liberation movement. The movement was peasant-narodnik (populist) in character. The brief period of flourishing Byelorussian national consciousness and the flourishing of the creative forces of national intelligentsia collapsed in the 1920s.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Elite in Post-Communist Eastern Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 402

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.