The Limits of Religious Thought Examined in Eight Lectures, Preached before the University of Oxford, in the Year M.DCCC.LVIII. on the Foundation of the Late Rev. John Bampton

By Henry Longueville Mansel | Go to book overview

LECTURE VII.

YET YE SAY, THE WAY OF THE LORD IS NOT EQUAL. HEAR NOW, O HOUSE OF ISRAEL; IS NOT MY WAY EQUAL? ARE NOT YOUR WAYS UNEQUAL? -- EZEKIEL XVIII. 25.

"If I build again the things which I destroyed, I make myself a transgressor."1 This text might be appropriately prefixed to an examination of that system of moral and religious criticism which, at the close of the last century, succeeded for a time in giving a philosophical connection to the hitherto loose and floating theological rationalism of its age and country.(1) It was indeed a marvellous attempt to send forth from the same fountain sweet waters and bitter, to pull down and to build up by the same act and method. The result of the Critical Philosophy, as applied to the speculative side of human Reason, was to prove beyond all question the existence of certain necessary forms and laws of Intuition and thought, which impart a corresponding character to all the objects of which Consciousness, intuitive or reflective, can take cognizance. Consciousness was thus exhibited as a Relation between the human mind and its object; and this conclusion, once established, is fatal to the very conception of a Philosophy of the Absolute. But by an inconsistency scarcely to be paralleled in the history of philosophy, the author of this comprehensive criticism attempted to deduce a partial conclusion from universal premises, and to

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1

Galatians ii. 18.

-182-

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The Limits of Religious Thought Examined in Eight Lectures, Preached before the University of Oxford, in the Year M.DCCC.LVIII. on the Foundation of the Late Rev. John Bampton
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Extract From The Last Will and Testament Of The Rev. John Bampton, Canon of Salisbury. V
  • Publishers' Advertisement - T0 The American Edition. VII
  • P R E F a C E - To The Third Edition. 9
  • Contents 35
  • Lecture I. 45
  • Lecture Ii. 68
  • Lecture Iii. 91
  • Lecture Iv. 114
  • Lecture V. 136
  • Lecture Vi. 158
  • Lecture Vii. 182
  • Lecture Viii. 204
  • Notes. 229
  • Index of Authors. 363
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