INDEX
Aboriginal 7, 98 n3
al-Arabi, Ibn153
al-Ghazali, Mohammed152
Anglican Church 45 anti-realism 25ff; 39ff
Aquinas, St Thomas15, 111, 114, 137, 173
Aristotle 14-15, 17, 75, 81, 114, 172-73
Augustine, St9, 70, 110, 125, 142
Baal Shem Toy126ff
Beck, A.T.54-56
Berkeley, Bp.91
Boyd, Andrew113
Bradley, F.H.27
Callaghan, Brendan177
Camus, Albert87, 103
Conant, James142
constructivism 57ff
Copleston, Frederick79
cosmological argument, the 16
Dawkins, Richard102, 103
De Beauvoir, Simone110
Derrida, Jacques 96, 106, 115
Descartes, Rene7, 29, 35, 111
design argument, the 18-19
despair 133
Dostoyevsky, Fyodor6, 85ff, 98, 103, 157
epistemology 65ff
evil, radical 71ff
fear of truth 164
Fernandez-Armesto, Felipe5
Foster, Jodi61, 182
Foucault, Michel99
Freud, Sigmund49ff, 111
gender 107ff
grace 23
Grisez, Germaine170
Habermas, Jurgen99 n7
Hamlet166
Hare, R.M.91
Hasidic Judaism 128
Havel, Vaclav154ff, 176
Hegel, Georg27, 74ff; 119, 133ff
Hemmings, Laurence106
heresy 46
Hinduism 21
Hoose, Bernard171
Hoschel, Abraham126ff
Hume, David32, 183
ideology 160

-201-

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What Is Truth?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page III
  • New College Lectures and Publications V
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Dedication and Acknowledgments xi
  • Part One - What is Truth? 1
  • 1 - The Implications of a Denial of Truth--Or the Claim to Have It 3
  • 2 - Realism and Anti-Realism 12
  • 3 - Foundations Without Indubitability 29
  • 4 - Anti-Realism in Religion and Morality 38
  • 5 - Constructivism in Psychology 49
  • Part Two - There is No Truth Out There 63
  • 7 - Ontology and Epistemology 65
  • 8 - Hegel and Marx 74
  • 9 - Nietzsche and Ivan Karamazov 79
  • 10 - The Denial of a Real World 89
  • 11 - Post-Modernism 95
  • 12 - Post-Modernism and Self-Identity 105
  • 13 - Interim Conclusion 117
  • Part Three - The Centre Can Hold 121
  • 14 - The Path to Truth 123
  • 15 - The Kotzker 126
  • 16 - Soren Kierkegaard and Subjectivity 132
  • 17 - Wittgenstein and Perspicuity 141
  • 18 - The Sufis 151
  • 19 - Vaclav Havel and Living the Truth 156
  • 20 - Fear and Freedom 164
  • 21 - Bringing the Threads Together 182
  • Notes 190
  • Index 201
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