Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy

By Thomas C. Kennedy | Go to book overview

Preface

FOLLOWING the death of Charles Austin Beard ( 1874-1948), numerous tributes testified to his formidable influence upon American thought and institutions as a result of his multifaceted career as a historian, political scientist, teacher, educator, and champion of progressive-liberal causes. But Beard's death also occasioned pointed allusions to what had been, in the opinion of some friends as well as hostile critics, a decline in Beard's reputation as "the dean of American historians." As one historian suggested in 1954, "It is indisputable that his prestige was higher ten or twelve years before his death than it has been since."1

The fundamental reason for this development may be found in the extent of unfavorable response to Beard's last two volumes on President Franklin D. Roosevelt's conduct of American diplomacy prior to World War II.2 But his waning prestige also coincided

____________________
1
Robert E. Burke, review of Howard K. Beale, ed., Charles A. Beard: An Appraisal, hereafter cited as Beard Appraisal, in American Historical Review 60 ( October 1954):116. Full citations of references appear in the Bibliography, which is divided into three main parts. The first is made up of references to Beard's works, subdivided into (1) books, pamphlets, and edited works, and (2) articles, essays, and book reviews. The second contains works referring to or about Beard. The third has general works, including manuscript collections.
2
Charles A. Beard, American Foreign Policy in the Making, 1932-1940: A Study in Responsibilities, hereafter cited as Foreign Policy in the Making; Beard, President Roosevelt and the Coming of the War, 1941: A Study in Appearances and Realities, hereafter cited as Roosevelt and the War.

-ix-

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Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - The Formative Years, 1874-1904 1
  • 2 - Years of Academic Achievement And Controversy, 1904-1914 15
  • 3 - The War Years, 1914-1919 28
  • 4 - The Peace Settlement to the Great Depression, 1919-1930 40
  • 5 - Formulating a Philosophy Of Isolationism, 1931-1935) 58
  • 6 - Waging the Cause of Neutrality, 1935-1941 78
  • 7 - Beard During World War Ii, 1941-1945 105
  • 8 - The Efforts to Confirm a Thesis, 1945-1948 128
  • 9 - Epilogue 154
  • Appendix 169
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 193
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