Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy

By Thomas C. Kennedy | Go to book overview

1
The Formative Years, 1874-1904

CHARLES AUSTIN BEARD, the youngest of the two sons of Mary Payne and William Henry Harrison Beard, was born on November 27, 1874. The birth site was a modest family farm north of Knightstown, Indiana, approximately forty miles east of Indiana polis. His forebears came from a long line of English and ScotchIrish colonists and included two Pilgrims. By the eighteenth century, some Beards from Nantucket, Massachusetts, had settled in North Carolina, with some of their descendants making their way to Indiana during the nineteenth century.1

One of the relatives who might have influenced the development of Charles Beard's character was his grandfather, Nathan Beard, who often displayed an independence of mind and action that was a hallmark of his grandson's career as a scholar, educator, publicist, and reformer. Though reared in the Quaker faith, for example, Beard's grandfather rejected a doctrinaire approach to religious questions, an attitude boldly expressed in his decision to marry a Methodist. Nathan Beard, who participated in the "underground railway" of North Carolina which aided runaway slaves in their

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1
Peter A. Soderbergh, "Charles A. Beard, the Quaker Spirit, and North Carolina", p. 19; Paul L. Schmunk, "Charles Austin Beard: A Free Spirit, 18741919", p. 7.

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Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - The Formative Years, 1874-1904 1
  • 2 - Years of Academic Achievement And Controversy, 1904-1914 15
  • 3 - The War Years, 1914-1919 28
  • 4 - The Peace Settlement to the Great Depression, 1919-1930 40
  • 5 - Formulating a Philosophy Of Isolationism, 1931-1935) 58
  • 6 - Waging the Cause of Neutrality, 1935-1941 78
  • 7 - Beard During World War Ii, 1941-1945 105
  • 8 - The Efforts to Confirm a Thesis, 1945-1948 128
  • 9 - Epilogue 154
  • Appendix 169
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 193
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