Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy

By Thomas C. Kennedy | Go to book overview

2
Years of Academic Achievement and Controversy, 1904-1914

CHARLES A. BEARD'S appointment in 1904 as a Lecturer in History at Columbia University inaugurated a distinguished thirteen-year association with an institution that was one of the outstanding intellectual centers of the nation during the Progressive Era. Beard himself became one of the "galaxy of teachers" who adorned the faculty of the college on Morningside Heights in New York City. To employ the felicitous phrase of Richard Hofstadter, Beard's "energies of demonic intensity" resulted in a prodigious publication record and participation in manifold reform activities, particularly in municipal administration and reform. These achievements were more than matched by his outstanding skills as an orator (the fruition, perhaps, of extensive debating experience even before he went to England) and his consistent popularity as a teacher.1

This period was marked also by writings and activities that continued to underscore the tensions between Beard's desire to be a

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1
Irwin Edman, Philosopher's Holiday, pp. 129-31; Arthur E. Soderlind, "Charles A. Beard and the Social Studies", p. 28; Hofstadter, Progressive Historians, p. 292; R. Gordon Hoxie et al., A History of the Faculty of Political Science, Columbia University, p. 84; Josephson, "Charles A. Beard: A Memoir", pp. 585-86; Macmahon, "Charles Beard, the Teacher", in Beard Appraisal, pp. 213-30.

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Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - The Formative Years, 1874-1904 1
  • 2 - Years of Academic Achievement And Controversy, 1904-1914 15
  • 3 - The War Years, 1914-1919 28
  • 4 - The Peace Settlement to the Great Depression, 1919-1930 40
  • 5 - Formulating a Philosophy Of Isolationism, 1931-1935) 58
  • 6 - Waging the Cause of Neutrality, 1935-1941 78
  • 7 - Beard During World War Ii, 1941-1945 105
  • 8 - The Efforts to Confirm a Thesis, 1945-1948 128
  • 9 - Epilogue 154
  • Appendix 169
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 193
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