Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy

By Thomas C. Kennedy | Go to book overview

7
Beard during World War II, 1941-1945

ON SUNDAY afternoon, December 7, 1941, Beard recalled, upon learning of the events at Pearl Harbor, that he "was convinced that here was no mere accident or incident of war, but a culmination in more than a hundred years of American diplomatic negotiations and activities in respect of the Far East, and the opening of a new and dangerous age for the Republic.1 But whatever suspicions he might have harbored about responsibilities immediately after the Japanese attack, he publicly set them aside during the next few years. Similarly repressed, for a time, were his misgivings about the necessity of American participation in World War II and about the nature of the postwar world. Indeed, there were occasions when Beard publicly and vigorously expressed support for the prosecution of the war against the Axis Powers, a support given added poignancy because his son, William, was serving in the United States Army2

Comparable to his Liberty Bond appeals during World War I, Beard wrote a brief essay in the spring of 1942 to be used by the Treasury Department for the purpose of exhorting the public to purchase war bonds and stamps. He opened his appeal with a brief

____________________
1
Roosevelt and the War, p. 234n.
2
Beard to Curti, February 1, 1943, Curti Papers, Box 4, Folder 13.

-105-

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Charles A. Beard and American Foreign Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • 1 - The Formative Years, 1874-1904 1
  • 2 - Years of Academic Achievement And Controversy, 1904-1914 15
  • 3 - The War Years, 1914-1919 28
  • 4 - The Peace Settlement to the Great Depression, 1919-1930 40
  • 5 - Formulating a Philosophy Of Isolationism, 1931-1935) 58
  • 6 - Waging the Cause of Neutrality, 1935-1941 78
  • 7 - Beard During World War Ii, 1941-1945 105
  • 8 - The Efforts to Confirm a Thesis, 1945-1948 128
  • 9 - Epilogue 154
  • Appendix 169
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 193
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