The Augustan World: Life and Letters in Eighteenth-Century England

By A. R. Humphreys | Go to book overview

PREFACE

I N the world of scholarship the eighteenth century has received abundant honour, but in that of the general reader a good many misconceptions still seem to survive. This book arose from my desire to explore outwards from literature into society and then return from society to literature again. Its intention was as much critical as social-historical, and if the critical aim is imperfectly realised that is my own shortcoming: to examine six major topics and still preserve a sense of critical relevance proved anything but easy, and success may well have eluded me. My hope at least is that Augustan literature may be more understandingly and percipiently read by those who sense how the writer might feel in his world.

Each chapter may be taken by itself yet has also its place in a pattern. Social life leads to the economic activities which supported it, and those to politics into which social life and economics so readily ran. Religion follows on the politics to which it was closely related, and is followed by philosophy to complete the framework of moral thought. Lastly the visual arts are included to reflect the taste of the age. Certain other subjects, such as education and linguistic conditions, had perforce to be left out, since they could have been accommodated only by considerable enlargement of the book or by serious abbreviation of the restricted space allowed to what is already here. In each chapter the last section tries more specifically than the others to show how literature was influenced. A certain amount of repetition proved unavoidable; the subjects of more than one chapter may affect literature similarly, and some writers are equally relevant to more than one subject. I hope, however, that passages which have echoes in the book may still be found essential to their own contexts.

Many colleagues at the University College of Leicester have given generously of their time and scholarship to help me in fields where they are much more at home than I: I thank

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Augustan World: Life and Letters in Eighteenth-Century England
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • I. Social Life 1
  • Iii. Public Affairs 98
  • Iv. Religious Life 138
  • V. Philosophy Moral and Natural 179
  • Vi. the Visual Arts 217
  • Reading Lists 261
  • Index 271
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 283

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.