France and Latin-American Independence

By William Spence Robertson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
FRANCE AND THE CHANGING AMERICA

After the Congress of Aix-la-Chapelle, Frenchmen became keenly aware of the need of encouraging trade with Latin America. This conviction was occasionally shown in measures which were primarily of a scientific character. In the autumn of 1818 the Minister of Marine decided to employ a small fleet to make a survey of the Brazilian coast. As the leader of this undertaking he selected Captain Albin Roussin, who had recently directed hydrographic explorations on the western coast of Africa. On September 30 Molé notified Roussin that, early in the following year, with the corvette Bayadère and other vessels stationed at Toulon, he was to proceed to the coast of South America.1

Molé signed that captain's instructions on November 23, 1818. Roussin was directed to leave Brest about the middle of January and to sail to southern Brazil, where his investigations were to start. He was to reconnoitre that coast from the island of Santa Catharina to Rio de Janeiro, to make surveys at specified points on the route between that capital and Cayenne, and to terminate his investigations at Cape North on the coast of Guiana.2 Although the collection of hydrographic data was to be his chief object, he was to gather all the information that he possibly could concerning the commerce, industry, population, and maritime strength of the sections where he made surveys. He was also directed to regulate carefully the behavior of his ex-

____________________
1
A. N., Marine, BB,4, 404.
2
Ibid.; Roussin, Le Pilote du Brésil, p. 9.

-178-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
France and Latin-American Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 626

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.