France and Latin-American Independence

By William Spence Robertson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
CHATEAUBRIAND'S CONSTRUCTIVE POLICY

Chateaubriand not only had important views with respect to French interference in Spanish America but also adopted an attitude which was pregnant with consequences with regard to the acknowledgment of Spanish-American independence by England, the reform of Spanish colonial policy, and the dispatch of French commissioners to the Indies. At times even those issues involved a consideration of intervention.

Chateaubriand did not readily relinquish the plan of holding a European congress, as outlined in his circular of November 1, 1823. On November 23 he wrote to Talaru and expressed his pleasure at the information that Ferdinand VII had decided to demand the mediation of the Great Powers in colonial affairs. Yet he advised the ambassador that, as England was still a member of the Grand Alliance, she must be invited to attend the meeting. He therefore instructed Talaru that the Spanish Government should be induced to direct its ambassador at London to urge that England send a delegate to the conference. If she did so France would be placed between England, which wished to sacrifice the rights of Spain, and the other powers, which perhaps anticipated in the conference only a discussion of principles. In a postscript written in his own sprawling handwriting, Chateaubriand explained his views concerning the proposed congress:

If England accepts the invitation to the conference, she will find herself involved in a negotiation which will pre-

-296-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
France and Latin-American Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 626

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.