France and Latin-American Independence

By William Spence Robertson | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XII
RECOGNITION OF THE BRAZILIAN EMPIRE

As the years passed after the Congress of Vienna, Frenchmen showed increasing awareness that steps were called for to improve their relations with the colonial dominions of the Portuguese. In December, 1819, one Delaroche addressed a representation to his government pointing out the special benefits which France would derive from the development of commercial relations with Portuguese America. He urged it to dispatch missions to outlying sections of Latin America in the interest of commerce and politics.1 Minister of Marine Portal directed the attention of Baron Pasquier to the need of making satisfactory arrangements with the monarchy seated at Rio de Janeiro concerning the privileges to be enjoyed in Brazil by French navigators and merchants.2 The intercourse of France with that country was complicated, however, by the residence of the Braganza dynasty in Rio de Janeiro and by the precarious relations existing between Brazil and Portugal. Further, the proceedings of a Cortes which met in Lisbon early in 1821 stimulated the revolutionary spirit that had been developing in Brazil. The situation was further complicated when, in April, 1821, King John VI appointed his son Pedro as regent and took ship for Lisbon.

In April, 1821, Minister Clermont-Tonnerre had notified Colonel Maler, who was still serving as chargé d'affaires

____________________
1
December 18, 1819, A. A. E., Mémoires et Documents, Amé- rique, 35.
2
Gervain, Un ministre de la marine et son ministère sous la restauration, pp. 103-04.

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