Chilean Politics, 1920-1931: The Honorable Mission of the Armed Forces

By Frederick M. Nunn | Go to book overview

APPENDIXES

APPENDIX A
The Manifestos of September 10 and 11, 1924

THE ISSUING OF THE TWO FOLLOWING DOCUMENTS, BY TWO DISTINCT ENtities on successive days, proved the existence of an intra-army rift less than a week after the inception of the Honorable Mission. Had this rift not been important, only one public statement (that of the Junta of Government) would have appeared. On only one issue were the government and the Junta Militar in accord: military rule would be short-lived and impartial. The basis of conflict was the ultimate purpose of the 1924 political action by the armed forces.

The September 10 government statement emphasized a rapid return to normalcy as the ultimate solution for Chile's political woes, and hence for the pressing social and economic problems of the nation. But the Junta Miltar's manifesto, written by Bartolomé Blanche, went further. Its emphasis was on the creation of a new order as prerequisite to normalcy, that is, civilian constitutional government.

Both factions stressed the idea that political deliberation by the armed forces was an obligation and not a usurpation. Both documents indicated that the military acted in the interests of Chile and not of any particular civilian faction or clique. It can be noted that the government looked upon political disintegration as primarily the result of the previous four years of stalemate -- the White Anarchy of Alessandri's Administration. On the other hand, the Junta Militar's manifesto, by calling for constitutional reform, indicated that the blame for political disintegration lay with the political system itself -- the constitutional structure of Chilean politics. All subsequent politico-military controversies stemmed from interpretation of the Manifesto of September 11, 1924. While both groups of military leaders differed widely in opinion on social and economic policies, the political and constitutional conflict was of greatest importance in 1924.p0177.*


Manifesto of the Junta of Government, September 10, 1924
TO THE NATION

The events that have occurred with marked rapidity move us to express our purposes and our desires to the Nation.

____________________
p0177.*
Both documents originally appeared in the Santiago press.

-177-

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Chilean Politics, 1920-1931: The Honorable Mission of the Armed Forces
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Politics of Change, 1920-1924 7
  • 2. Year of the Lion 19
  • 3. White Anarchy 28
  • Part Two - The Military and the Politics of Change 1924-1927 45
  • 5. Military Rule 67
  • 6. the Mission Continues 88
  • Part Three - Politics on the Military's Terms, 1927-931 115
  • 8. the Institutionalized Mission 134
  • 9. the Mission Ends 160
  • Appendixes 177
  • Notes 185
  • Selective Bibliographical Note - On Chilean Politics and the Armed Forces, 1920-31 204
  • Index 213
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