The Romance of the Forest

By Ann Radcliffe; Chloe Chard | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Adeline, the heroine of The Romance of the Forest, is portrayed, towards the middle of the novel, reading an old and partially illegible manuscript which she has found in a concealed room in a ruined abbey, and which tells a story of imprisonment and suffering within the confines of this same building. As she comes to the words 'Last night! last night! O scene of horror!', her reactions are recounted as follows:

Adeline shuddered. She feared to read the coming sentence, yet curiosity prompted her to proceed. Still she paused: an unaccountable dread came over her. 'Some horrid deed has been done here,' said she; 'the reports of the peasants are true. Murder has been committed.' The idea thrilled her with horror.

In describing the process by which Adeline reads the manuscript, The Romance of the Forest underlines the promise of horror and terror on which its own narrative structure is based. Like all works of Gothic fiction, the novel constantly raises the expectation of future horrors, suggesting that dreadful secrets are soon to be revealed, and threatening the eruption of extreme--though often unspecified--forms of violence. The passage just quoted affirms very strongly the power of a narrative of mystery and impending violence to produce such moments of horror and terror: in anticipating imminent confirmation of her suspicion that 'murder has been committed', Adeline is so overcome with horror that she is prevented--for a while--from reading further.

The narrative pattern which the Gothic novel actually follows, however, differs in one very important respect from that which it promises--and which is dramatized in the account of Adeline's reaction to the manuscript. The reader of a work of Gothic fiction, far from being thrown into fits of such overwhelming horror that he or she casts the novel aside unfinished, is constantly urged onwards by that very emotion of 'curiosity' which, in Adeline's case, fails to conquer her fear of what she may discover if she reads further. In order to stimulate this response of curiosity, the moments of climactic

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Romance of the Forest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Romance of the Forest i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxv
  • Select Bibliography xxvi
  • A Chronology of Ann Radcliffe xxix
  • Advertisement ii
  • Volume I 1
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 15
  • Chapter III 33
  • Chapter III 44
  • Chapter III 59
  • Chapter III 97
  • Volume II 111
  • Chapter X 137
  • Chapter XII 172
  • Chapter XIII 205
  • Volume III 224
  • Chapter XVI 240
  • Chapter XVIII 271
  • Chapter XIX 293
  • Chapter XX 307
  • Chapter XXI 315
  • Chapter XXII 332
  • Chapter XXIII 335
  • Chapter XXIII 345
  • Chapter XXIII 351
  • Explanatory Notes 364
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 398

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.