A Critical History of English Poetry

By Herbert J. C. Grierson; J. C. Smith | Go to book overview

Chapter Six
THE TUDOR RENAISSANCE

THOUGH the fifteenth century was so barren in England, great things were being done elsewhere--the invention of printing, the invention of gunpowder, the discovery of America, and (what concerns us more immediately)the rediscovery of Ancient Greece. Petrarch was the first of the moderns to discern in Classical Antiquity the outlines of a real living civilisation. He himself discerned these things dimly, not having Greek enough to read the original texts. But from about 1400 Greek teachers began to be invited to Italy from Constantinople, and Greek studies made great progress in the peninsula, progress which was accelerated when the fall of Constantinople in 1453 drove many Greek scholars to seek refuge in Italy, bringing their manuscripts with them. A passion for Greek, and with it a new interest in classical as opposed to monkish Latin, fired the rival academies of Naples, Rome, and Florence, and led to that literary and artistic revival which we call the Italian Renaissance. The early Humanists were good Catholics, who saw in Classical Antiquity a preparation for, not a rival to, Christianity; later they became less orthodox.

England, as usual, lagged behind the Continent, but by 1500 Greek was being taught at Oxford. Later Erasmus taught it at Cambridge, where it was fostered by Smith and Cheke, the Sir John Cheke who, as Milton reminds us,

taught Cambridge and King Edward Greek.

Still the study remained academic; it scarcely influenced vernacular literature directly till the days of Spenser and Sidney. But long before that a breath of the Renaissance spring had begun to blow northward from Italy and to thaw the ice of scholasticism, asceticism, pessimism, and formalised emotion which encrusted the dying Middle Ages. We shall call this the First, or Tudor, Renaissance.

Henry VII was too busy establishing his dynasty to do much for let-

-68-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Critical History of English Poetry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 600

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.