The Franco-Russian Alliance, 1890-1894

By William Leonard Langer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
THE DEBUT OF WILLIAM II

BISMARCK had been enabled to follow a consistent policy because he could, in the last resort, always rely on his master's approval. The old Emperor, imbued though he was with a profound belief in the value of Russian friendship, had been persuaded to assent to the Austro-German Treaty and had, on occasion, been induced to acquiesce in what seemed at times like a really hostile policy towards Russia. It was extremely unfortunate for Bismarck and for Germany that at a moment so crucial as that of the Bulgarian crisis two changes of ruler became necessary within the brief period of three months.

Frederick III, who succeeded his father in March 1888, was married to an English wife who had long exercised a powerful influence over him. Far from being Russophil, he dallied with the ideas of English liberalism and was generally reckoned a member of the group, composed chiefly of high military men, who were inclined to support Austria in the Near East and to seize the opportune moment to remove the Russian menace by force of arms.1 Bismarck had never enjoyed the confidence of the new ruler and had every reason to fear complications. In the very first crown council under the presidency of the new Emperor he deemed it necessary to summarize his whole policy and to warn his master of the dangers involved in a change of front. Austria, he pointed out, must not take action until England could be induced to give up her traditional passivity, until the English cannon boomed on the Bosporus as they had in the Crimean War. But as a concession to the sentiments of Frederick he discreetly added that, if Austria nevertheless became involved in war with Russia, Germany might at first "play dead," but in

____________________
1
On the attitude of Frederick III see the anonymous pamphlet: Videant Consules ne quid Respublica Detrimenti capiat ( Cassel 1890) p. 38.

-26-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Franco-Russian Alliance, 1890-1894
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 460

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.