The Franco-Russian Alliance, 1890-1894

By William Leonard Langer | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
THE MEDITERRANEAN PROBLEM AND THE POSITION OF ITALY

THE danger of Austria's deserting her alliance with Germany was probably never very great. On the other hand Italy was a real problem and one which taxed the statesmanship of the allied ministers to the utmost. The position of Italy in international affairs can perhaps best be treated in connection with French policy.

Italy had been literally driven into the Triple Alliance by the French occupation of Tunis in May 1881 and she was kept there by general fear of further French ambitions in North Africa and in the western Mediterranean. King Humbert undoubtedly desired the connection with the central monarchies for dynastic reasons and from considerations of domestic politics. But the alliance with Austria was never popular. The country accepted it only because it recognized the blocking of French expansion as more important than the pursuit of Italia Irredenta. There had been great dissatisfaction with the alliance, however, and it was not until Bismarck in 1887 had consented to support Italian policy in the Mediterranean and until he had enlisted the English on the Italian side by the Mediterranean Agreements that the statesmen in the Consulta had agreed to the renewal of the treaty for a second period of five years.

It was not until after the fall of Jules Ferry and the abrupt ending of the Franco-German entente in 1885 that the French action against Italy began in earnest.1 Ferry himself had been more interested in the Far Eastern problem, and since his un-

____________________
1
For a good conventional summary of Franco-Italian relations between 1885 and 1895 see F. Despagnet: La Diplomatie de la Troisième République ( Paris 1904) pp. 458-469; from the Italian side: G. E. Curàtulo: Francia e Italia 1849- 1914 ( Turin 1915). According to A. Billot: Le Rapprochement Commercial entre la France et l'Italie ( Revue des Deux Mondes January 1, 1899) it was the advent of Crispi that opened the period of tension.

-110-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Franco-Russian Alliance, 1890-1894
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 460

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.