CHAPTER XI
KING OF THE APES

I T was not yet dark when he reached the tribe, though he stopped to exhume and devour the remains of the wild boar he had cached the preceding day, and again to take Kulonga's bow and arrows from the tree top in which he had hidden them.

It was a well-laden Tarzan who dropped from the branches into the midst of the tribe of Kerchak.

With swelling chest he narrated the glories of his adventure and exhibited the spoils of conquest.

Kerchak grunted and turned away, for he was jealous of this strange member of his band. In his little evil brain he sought for some excuse to wreak his hatred upon Tarzan.

The next day Tarzan was practicing with his bow and arrows at the first gleam of dawn. At first he lost nearly every bolt he shot, but finally he learned to guide the little shafts with fair accuracy, and ere a month had passed he was no mean shot; but his proficiency had cost him nearly his entire supply of arrows.

The tribe continued to find the hunting good in

-125-

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Tarzan of the Apes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Tarzan of the Apes 1
  • Chapter II - The Savage Home 17
  • Chapter III - Life and Death 32
  • Chapter IV - The Apes 42
  • Chapter V - The White Ape 53
  • Chapter VI - Jungle Battles 65
  • Chapter VII - The Light of Knowledge 75
  • Chapter VIII - The Tree-Top Hunter 92
  • Chapter IX - Man and Man 101
  • Chapter X - The Fear-Phantom 117
  • Chapter XI - King of the Apes 125
  • Chapter XII - Man's Reason 141
  • Chapter XIII - His Own Kind 153
  • Chapter XIV - At the Mercy of the Jungle 174
  • Chapter XV - The Forest God 189
  • Chapter XVI - Most Remarkable 198
  • Chapter XVII - Burials 213
  • Chapter XVIII - The Jungle Toll 229
  • Chapter XIX - The Call of the Primitive 244
  • Chapter XX - Heredity 260
  • Chapter XXI - The Village of Torture 278
  • Chapter XXII - The Search Party 288
  • Chapter XXIII - Brother Men 304
  • Chapter XXIV - Lost Treasure 317
  • Chapter XXV - The Outpost of the World 329
  • Chapter XXVI - The Height of Civilization 344
  • Chapter XXVII - The Giant Again 360
  • Chapter XXVIII - Conclusion 379
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