CHAPTER TWELVE Tonking, to the Settlement

IN the last months of 1884 more and more was happening to strengthen the section of opinion in England which regretted the Franco-Chinese war, against the opposite tendency to welcome it. To begin with, China was becoming a dangerous place for all foreigners. There were formidable riots at Canton in 1883 and at Hankow and Wenchow in 1884; reports were coming in of inflammatory placards at Wuhu, unrest at and around Chinkiang, anti-Catholic outbreaks at Swatow.1 Moreover, French agents in China were threatening a blockade of the Gulf of Pechili in the spring, for the purpose of cutting off rice from the capital. This, Parkes realised, would not cripple Peking, but it would cripple British trade in the north.2 The effects of the Formosa blockade, re-established from 7 January, were described as "very serious to foreigners, but almost harmless to the Chinese".3 Foreign vessels, Admiral Dowell explained, were pulled up by the French, whereas native junks slipped in and out as they pleased.4 The Governor of Hongkong wrote that all traders there welcomed Britain's mediation, the hostilities being "disastrous to the interests of that great commerce, of which England enjoys by far the greatest share".5 An Englishman in Chinese service, Captain Harvey--inventor of a Sea Torpedo--wrote to a friend at home: "If the contest with France continues trade will be ruined, the people will rise first against the foreigners, then against the mandarins, and there will be horrible doings.

____________________
1
Parkes248, 4.11. 84), 27. 2716; 254 and 255, 6.11. 84), 27. 2716; 260 and 261, 10.11. 84), 27. 2716; 282 and 283, 24.11. 84), 27. 2717; 287, 25.11. 84), 27. 2717; 300, 301 and 302, 1.12. 84), 27. 2718.
2
Parkes319, 13.12. 84), 27. 2719.
3
Parkes343, 31.12. 84), 27. 2719.
4
Extract from letter to Sir C. Key, 27. 2769.
5
Bowen381, 17.11.84, 27. 2719.

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Diplomacy in China, 1880 to 1885
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.