Government and Nationalism in Southeast Asia

By Rupert Emerson; Lennox A. Mills et al. | Go to book overview

EDITORIAL NOTE

This book was completed and in proof when Japan went to war against the United States and the British and Netherlands Empires. Despite the changes which the Japanese offensive in Southeast Asia is inevitably bringing to the political and economic systems of that area, it has seemed best to publish the book immediately without attempting to revise it for the dayto-day changes produced by the war. To make such a revision would involve indefinite delay in publication at a time when there is an urgent new need for reasonably up-to-date information on the countries of Southeast Asia.

It will be obvious to all who have studied Japan's earlier methods in Formosa, Korea, Manchuria and occupied China, that far-reaching administrative changes can be expected, especially in the upper and middle levels of government, wherever Japanese rule is established. Even in countries like Indo-China and Thailand which have not been technically conquered it is certain that Japanese (or trusted pro-Japanese agents) are taking key positions (nominally, perhaps, advisory but actually controlling) in both economic and political administration. Such a process had already begun under combined German and Japanese pressure in the Vichy-directed government of Indo China, long before Japan declared war.

The Japanese offensive is producing equally important, though less predictable changes in the nationalist movements of Southeast Asia. In many areas it is clear that the attack has dramatically dissolved old animosities between nationalists and the colonial governments and produced a new sense of solidarity against the invader. This appears to be notably true of the Netherlands Indies. It is too soon to say how far Japan will be able to counteract this tendency by using former nationalist or dissident groups to establish puppet pro-Japanese regimes in the invaded areas of the Philippines, Malaya and Borneo. There is some evidence that the Japanese have already so used groups of Annamese nationalists in Indo-China and have attempted to subsidize movements among other groups in the Philippines and certain tribes in Burma.

-xi-

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Government and Nationalism in Southeast Asia
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Institute of Pacific Relations iv
  • Title Page v
  • Foreward vii
  • Editorial Note xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I - Introduction 1
  • Part II - The Governments of Southeast Asia 37
  • Author's Note 38
  • 1. Introduction 39
  • Ii. the Philippines 53
  • Iii. Burma 70
  • Iv. British Malaya 78
  • V. Hongkong 92
  • Vi. the Netherlands Indies 97
  • Vii. French Indo-China 107
  • Viii. Taiwan 113
  • Ix. Thailand 118
  • Part III - Nationalism and Nationalist Movements in Southeast Asia 125
  • I. Introduction: Comparative Nationalisms 127
  • Ii. the Philippines 145
  • Iii. Burma 159
  • Iv. British Malaya 169
  • V. the Netherlands Indies 182
  • Vi. French Indo-China 198
  • Vii. Thailand 211
  • Index 223
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