Federal Centralization: A Study and Criticism of the Expanding Scope of Congressional Legislation

By Walter Thompson | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abolitionist literature, proposal to discourage, 79
Adamson Law, 244
Agriculture, Department of, 17; an agency for information, 144; divisions of, 144, 145
Allen, E. W., on second Morrill Act, 151; on changing educational policy, 152
Amending process, weakness of, 211
Anti-Saloon League, 195, 196
Articles of Confederation, experience under, 21; commercial conditions under, 34; taxation under, 50
Bank of the United States, views on constitutionality, 53, 268, 269
Bank Notes, federal tax on, 57
Bill of Rights, suggested in federal convention, 21, 26
Blair, H. W., introducing prohibition amendment, 197
Board of Mediation and Conciliation, 280
Brewer, David J., on federal control of commerce, 246
Bryan, W. J., on difficulties of federal control, 364
Bryce, James, on unifying tendencies in governments, 308; on public opinion, 322; on citizen's contact with federal government, 325; definition of democracy, 368
Buchanan, James, veto of Morrill Act, 148
Bureaucracy, danger of, 366, 367
Business combinations, 255 ff.; methods of regulation employed, 227 ff.; dual regulation of, 264; summary, 271; naturally subject to federal control, 383
Calhoun, J. C., on the nature of the Union, 7; reason for his views, 9; view on taxing power, 54
Centralization, as a legal question, 14; more than a legal question, 15; ways in which accomplished, 16; reasons for, 307 ff.; hazards of, 349 ff.
Charters of incorporation, early attitude toward, 218; in Federal Convention, 218; power to issue, 268 ff.; extent of federal, 270; labor unions, 275
Child Labor, 131 ff.; regulation by taxation, 62, 63, 137; postal regulations to govern, 84 ff.; feasibility of constitutional amendment on, 138; possible regulation by federal grants, 158
Child Labor Cases, decision of court in, 134; dissenting opinion, 135 ff.; importance of decisions, 137, 138
Child Labor Laws, provision of the first, 132; analysis of, 132 ff.; an example of federal usurpation, 341 ff.
Children's Bureau, 138
Civil War, relation to question of sovereignty, 8, 9
Clay, Henry, 310
Clayton Act, 226; enumerating for-

-393-

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