The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History

By Joseph R. Conlin | Go to book overview

Remember that truth is greater than error, and we cannot put the greater into the less. Soul is Spirit, and Spirit is greater than body. If Spirit were once within the body, Spirit would be finite, and therefore could not be Spirit.

( Science and Health, 1875)

Christian Science explains all cause and effect as mental, not physical.

(Ibid.)

Thomas A. Edison (1847-1931): Inventor

Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration.

(Commonly attributed)

I never did anything worth doing by accident, nor did any of my inventions come by accident; they came by work.

(Ibid.)

I speak without exaggeration when I say that I have constructed three thousand different theories in connection with the electric light.... Yet in only two cases did my experiments prove the truth of my theory.

( Interview, 1878)

I am proud of the fact that I never invented weapons to kill.

( New York Times, 8 June 1915)

Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758): Calvinist theologian and philosopher

The God that holds you over the pit of hell, much as one holds a spider or some loathesome insect over the fire, abhors you, and is dreadfully provoked. His wrath toward you burns like fire; he looks upon you as worthy of nothing else but to be cast into the fire.

( "Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God," 1741)

The material universe exists only in the mind.

( "On Mind," c. 1720)

-97-

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The Morrow Book of Quotations in American History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 7
  • Preface 9
  • A 17
  • B 30
  • C 59
  • D 83
  • E 97
  • F 105
  • G 117
  • H 131
  • I 151
  • J 153
  • L 180
  • M 200
  • N 220
  • O 225
  • P 227
  • Q 238
  • R 238
  • S 260
  • T 280
  • V 297
  • W 300
  • X 327
  • Y 329
  • Z 330
  • A Grab Bag of Slogans And Catch Phrases 331
  • Index of Persons Quoted 337
  • Index of Subjects 345
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