New Lives for Old: Cultural Transformation -- Manus, 1928- 1953

By Margaret Mead | Go to book overview

III
Old Peri: an Economic Treadmill

Manus culture twenty-five years ago had distinction and style. The way of life of this handful of people, only about two thousand in all, differed from the way of life of other Admiralty tribes, of other Pacific peoples, and of every other group of people on earth, differed clearly, identifiably, systematically. It was not simply that their houses had a certain shape, as they stood with their dome-thatched roofs, supported on substantial houseposts in the shallow salt lagoons along the South Coast and among the southern islands of the Admiralties. Nor was it due to the shape of their spears and war charms, the high proud filigree handles of the feast bowls they used, or the wooden beds on which their brides stood. These ornamented objects they shared with other Admiralty Island tribes-with the Usiai, the agricultural people of the main island, and the various Matankor peoples of the smaller islands. All of these objects were distinctively Admiralty Islands in conception and execution and could have come from no other spot. Experts

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New Lives for Old: Cultural Transformation -- Manus, 1928- 1953
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgements xi
  • Geographical and Linguistic Note xix
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Part One 19
  • II - Arrival in Peri, 1953 21
  • III - Old Peri: An Economic Treadmill 45
  • IV - The Wider Context in 1928 70
  • V - Yesterday's Children Seen Today 103
  • VI - Roots of Change in Old Peri 138
  • Part Two 161
  • VII - The Unforeseeable: The Coming of the American Army 163
  • VIII - Paliau: The Man Who Met the Hour 188
  • IX - What Happened, 1946-1953 212
  • Part Three 243
  • X - New Peri 245
  • XI - The New Way 275
  • XII - "And Unto God the Things That Are God's" 317
  • XIII - Rage, Rhythm, and Autonomy 343
  • XIV - New Working of Old Themes 362
  • XV - The Sunday That Was Straight 386
  • XVI - Women, Sex, and Sin 399
  • XVII - Reprieve -- in Twentieth-Century Terms 411
  • XVIII - Implications for the World 435
  • Notes to Chapters 459
  • Notes to Plates 471
  • Appendix I 481
  • Appendix II 502
  • Appendix III 516
  • Appendix IV 521
  • References 529
  • Index 533
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