New Lives for Old: Cultural Transformation -- Manus, 1928- 1953

By Margaret Mead | Go to book overview

IX
What Happened, 1946-1953

It had taken just seven years to turn this little corner of the Admiralties from a remote, sleepy, forgotten bit of a territory, which had only itself been put on the map since the war, into a political actor on the world stage. We have seen how in the Manus cultural character we had found a point of leverage for change in the discontinuity between the happy comradeship of childhood and adolescence and the realities of adult life, but a point which without a changed external situation might never have been used. The Manus confronted with American culture could have been expected to respond positively. This was the one completely predictable element, given enough scientific knowledge of the way cultural characters are organized. Their delight in mechanical things, their sense of organization, their tendency to treat human beings both humanly and mechanically, their flexible here-and-now approach, their zest and optimism, their concern for children -- all these were elements which would predispose them to appreciate American culture.

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New Lives for Old: Cultural Transformation -- Manus, 1928- 1953
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Plates ix
  • Preface and Acknowledgements xi
  • Geographical and Linguistic Note xix
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • Part One 19
  • II - Arrival in Peri, 1953 21
  • III - Old Peri: An Economic Treadmill 45
  • IV - The Wider Context in 1928 70
  • V - Yesterday's Children Seen Today 103
  • VI - Roots of Change in Old Peri 138
  • Part Two 161
  • VII - The Unforeseeable: The Coming of the American Army 163
  • VIII - Paliau: The Man Who Met the Hour 188
  • IX - What Happened, 1946-1953 212
  • Part Three 243
  • X - New Peri 245
  • XI - The New Way 275
  • XII - "And Unto God the Things That Are God's" 317
  • XIII - Rage, Rhythm, and Autonomy 343
  • XIV - New Working of Old Themes 362
  • XV - The Sunday That Was Straight 386
  • XVI - Women, Sex, and Sin 399
  • XVII - Reprieve -- in Twentieth-Century Terms 411
  • XVIII - Implications for the World 435
  • Notes to Chapters 459
  • Notes to Plates 471
  • Appendix I 481
  • Appendix II 502
  • Appendix III 516
  • Appendix IV 521
  • References 529
  • Index 533
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