The Middle-Class Negro in the White Man's World

By Eli Ginzberg; Vincent Bryan et al. | Go to book overview

2: THE STUDENTS

In order to learn how Negroes are responding to the new career opportunities that are being opened to them, we decided to concentrate on men, since many fields are discriminatory with respect to sex as well as to race. If we had included women in our study, we would not have been able to delineate as sharply the ways in which employment opportunities are being broadened through the removal of racial barriers. Moreover, the career planning of women is heavily conditioned by considerations of marriage and children, and this would have made it difficult to assess the impact of changes specifically related to race.

Negro college men from middle-class homes represent a sizable group. The traditional approach to the analysis of such a group is to develop a representative national sample of several thousand and then systematically to interview them or ask them to complete a questionnaire. There is much to be said for both of these conventional approaches, but we proceeded differently.

Cost was one reason to seek an alternative approach, but it was only one. It seemed wise to structure our inquiry so that a relatively small number of young men

-8-

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The Middle-Class Negro in the White Man's World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • 1: Middle-Class Youth 1
  • 2: the Students 8
  • 3: Headstart 18
  • 4: Educational Aspirations 43
  • 5: Career Choices 67
  • 6: Life Goals 96
  • 7: Equality of Opportunity 127
  • 8: the Impact of Race 149
  • 9: the Road Ahead 172
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