Introducing James Joyce: A Selection of Joyce's Prose

By James Joyce; T. S. Eliot | Go to book overview

From ULYSSES

You, Cochrane, what city sent for him?

-- Tarentum, sir.

-- Very good, Well?

-- There was a battle, air.

-- Very good. Where?

The boy's blank face asked the blank window.

Fabled by the daughters of memory. And yet it was in some way if not as memory fabled it. A phrase, then, of impatience, thud of Blake's wings of excess. I hear the ruin of all space, shattered glass and toppling masonry, and time one livid final flame. What's left us then?

-- I forget the place, air. 279 B.C.

-- Asculum, Stephen said, glancing at the name and date in the gorescarred book.

-- Yes, sir. And he said: Another victory like that and we are done for.

That phrase the world had remembered. A dull ease of the mind. From a hill above a corpsestrewn plain a general speaking to his officers, leaned upon his spear. Any general to any officers. They lend ear.

-- You, Armstrong, Stephen said. What was the end of Pyrrhus?

-- End of Pyrrhus, sir?

-- I know, sir. Ask me, sir, Comyn said.

-- Wait. You, Armstrong. Do you know anything about Pyrrhus?

A bag of figrolls lay snugly in Armstrong's satchel. He curled them between his palms at whiles and swallowed them softly. Crumbs adhered to the tissues of his lips. A sweetened boy's breath. Welloff people, proud that their eldest son was in the navy. Vico Road, Dalkey.

-53-

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Introducing James Joyce: A Selection of Joyce's Prose
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Introductory Note 5
  • Contents 9
  • Acknowledgement 9
  • From Dubliners: the Sisters 11
  • From a Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man 20
  • From Ulysses 53
  • From Finnegans Wake 109
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