Fundamental Education, Common Ground for All Peoples: Report of a Special Committee to the Preparatory Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris, 1946

By Mekki Abbas; I. L. Kandel et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
INTRODUCTION

The Origins of the Present Document

Like a simple but impressive pattern which recurs within a more elaborate design, the theme of Fundamental Education is brought forward again and again in those discussions which have thus far advanced the programme of Unesco. And the pattern has itself developed, as these pages will show. The attack on illiteracy is not the whole of Fundamental Education; other elements, spiritual as well as material, appear as factors in the problem.

The development of the idea is evident both in the proceedings of the Preparatory Commission and in the work of the Secretariat. The record is revealing.

Within half an hour of the signature of the Final Act establishing the Organization, 16th November, 1945, Sir Alfred Zimmern, then acting as Executive Secretary, speaking before the First Plenary Meeting of the Commission, expressed his conviction that Fundamental Education should become one of the major concerns of Unesco. With respect to the long-term programme of the Organization, Sir Alfred said,

If I sense aright the feeling of the Conference--the purport of the resolutions put in, for instance, by the United States Delegation and speeches made by numerous delegates . . . [it] is that in the field of education the direction in which the new Organization would wish to direct its labours is in helping . . . the countries . . . which are faced with large masses of human beings living in conditions not only of poverty but of ignorance,

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Fundamental Education, Common Ground for All Peoples: Report of a Special Committee to the Preparatory Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris, 1946
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Committee ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Chapter I- Introduction 1
  • Chapter II- Noteworthy Examples 14
  • Chapter III- General Considerations 144
  • Chapter IV- Policies and Methods 215
  • Chapter V- Suggested Lines of Action 288
  • Appendix A- Contributors and Participants 306
  • Appendix B- Sources 314
  • Index 319
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