Fundamental Education, Common Ground for All Peoples: Report of a Special Committee to the Preparatory Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris, 1946

By Mekki Abbas; I. L. Kandel et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV POLICIES AND METHODS

The Special Importance of This Chapter

In some sense Fundamental Education forces us all to be pragmatists. At least we must face in the end two questions which bring all theory to the test of operation: What to do; and even more pointedly, What to do first? The wise choice of means, the order and relation of procedures, and the temper and spirit in which the whole enterprise is approached are matters of such vital significance that no descriptive account of contemporary endeavour and no conceptual analysis will have much value unless it is productive of sound decisions on these points. This chapter cannot offer final answers to these practical questions; but it can raise them in the sharpest form now possible, and it can offer the counsel of experts on some of them.

The pragmatic approach has its limitations, to be sure. When it comes to a question of values, other considerations enter in. The most important thing to do may not be the thing to do first. It may be the last thing to be done, as the climax to all that has gone before. Or it may be no one thing at all, no single act or series of acts, but a spirit or atmosphere pervading the entire work--or the mere fact that someone cares enough to do the work at all.

Chapter IV does not deal with policy for Unesco. That final problem is reserved for Chapter V. Unesco's policy involves issues not only of Fundamental Education in its own character but of international relations and the place of the Organisation in the structure and operation of the United Nations. What is here in question is policy and method in

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Fundamental Education, Common Ground for All Peoples: Report of a Special Committee to the Preparatory Commission of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, Paris, 1946
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Committee ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Chapter I- Introduction 1
  • Chapter II- Noteworthy Examples 14
  • Chapter III- General Considerations 144
  • Chapter IV- Policies and Methods 215
  • Chapter V- Suggested Lines of Action 288
  • Appendix A- Contributors and Participants 306
  • Appendix B- Sources 314
  • Index 319
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