The United States: An Outline of Political History, 1492-1871

By Goldwin Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II.
REVOLUTION, INDEPENDENCE, AND UNION.

IT cannot be too often repeated that the relation between the imperial country and a colonial dependency was radically false. It became more manifestly false as the colony grew in strength and every conceivable need of tutelage passed away. Separation was sure to come. It was visibly approaching. But its arrival was delayed, the tie of affection between the mother country and her offspring was for a time renewed, and the shadow on the dial which hastened towards the fatal hour was turned backward by the series of struggles in which Great Britain and her colonies were together engaged with France, the long arm of whose ambition reaching from Quebec round to the valley of the Mississippi threatened, or seemed to threaten, not only the ascendancy but the security of Englishmen in the new world, while native savages under French Catholic instigation were always harassing the Protestant settlements of New England. The population of French Canada compared with that of the English colonies was very small, but all French Canadians of military age were fighting men. Their force was wielded by the single will of a military governor such as Frontenac or Montcalm, and with them were the regular troops of conquering France. The

1689 to 1759.

-64-

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The United States: An Outline of Political History, 1492-1871
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface. v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter I - The Colonies. 1
  • Chapter II - Revolution, Independence, and Union. 64
  • Chapter III - Republic 130
  • Chapter IV - Democracy and Slavery. 177
  • Chapter V - Rupture and Reconstruction 221
  • Index. 303
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