Writing under the Raj: Gender, Race, and Rape in the British Colonial Imagination, 1830-1947

By Nancy L. Paxton | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction
1.
For Burke comments, see Parliamentary Papers (1771-1774): 17:671. For analysis, see Kramnick (136). See also Marshall (Impeachment) and (British); Musselwhite; and Suleri. Percival Spear identifies Warren Hastings as the "real founder of the British domination in India" ( 2:92).
2.
Burke, "Speech in Opening the Imperial Impeachment, 19 February 1788," in Works ( 10: 83-89). See also Kramnick (137).
3.
Suleri discusses the effects of this rhetoric on Burke's audiences (59-63).
4.
See Ali; and Kabbani. Karkar and Ross offer a particularly interesting discussion of these tales of seduction (esp. 41).
5.
Suleri (59-63). Rosane Rocher's effort to "disaggregate" Edward Said's Orientalism has been especially helpful. Teltscher ( India Inscribed); Majeed; and Stokes offer excellent summaries of colonial policy in this period. For more general studies analyzing Said Orientalism, see Ahmad ( In Theory) and ( "Between"); Breckenridge and Van der Veer; Mackenzie ( Orientalism) and ("Edward Said"); Lowe; Dennis Porter; Robbins; and Turner. While British colonialism certainly reveals the European colonizer's imposing power and desire for political, economic, cultural, religious, and linguistic domination, I agree with Rocher's argument that recent scholars have overlooked the differences between the specific colonial policies of the group of colonial administrators originally called Orientalists, including Warren Hastings and Sir William Jones, and the positions of the group called Anglicanists, including, most notoriously, Thomas Macaulay. Said's appropriation of the term "Orientalists" has created considerable confusion, especially among literary critics.
6.
See Said Orientalism and his more recent Culture and Imperialism; Mannoni; Fanon; Donaldson; Sharpe ( Allegories); and Alloula. I have named these particular critics because their work has been especially influential. Others, of course, could be mentioned, particularly among more psychoanalytically inclined scholars. Literary critics, like Eric Meyer, who find the master text of Orientalist discourse in Byron's poetry, repeat Said's Orientalist bias in privileging Islamic over Hindu culture, since, in all but a few vapid lyrics like "Stanzas to a Hindoo Air," Byron avoids representing Hindu culture.

-273-

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