The Craft of Comedy

By Athene Seyler; Stephen Haggard | Go to book overview

of what she has learnt through enlarged experience both of life and of the technique of acting. This leads me to believe that if we try our hand at the technical craft of playing comedy we may in the process enlarge our own personality in a comedic direction.

This letter is getting too bulky for the post, so I will leave you here to send me your reactions.

ATHENE.

20th July 1939.

DEAR ATHENE,

You will see from the above date how hard and how long I, in my turn, have had to think about your letter.

I want to ask a lot of awkward questions.

First--(I have a feeling somebody has said this before)--what is truth? I mean, of course, truth in the theatre. Elusive though Truth is supposed to be, ought we not perhaps to pin her down with some sort of definition? Can one really regard her from different angles, as you suggest one should, or has she not perhaps a Victorian figure which can only properly be appreciated in the round? If you agree with Hamlet that the purpose of playing is to "hold a mirror up to nature" we have a very good yardstick with which to take her measurements. She must conform, brow, bust and bustle to what we are accustomed to expect from nature. An inch too much here or there and she changes her shape: we

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Craft of Comedy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Note *
  • Introduction to The Second Edition 1
  • Correspondence Between Athene Seyler And Stephen Haggard 7
  • The Wedding Morning 23
  • Love for Love 82
  • Fans, Trains and Stays 105
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 114

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.