Contemporary Unionism in the United States

By Clyde E. Dankert | Go to book overview

2
A Review of American Trade Union History (1)

THE AMERICAN labor movement is a product of long growth, and for a satisfactory understanding of its present-day characteristics it will be helpful to trace the main aspects of its development. As an evolving institution it has been conditioned by a wide range of influences: economic, political, geographical, psychological, philosophical. These influences, operating more or less incessantly, have placed distinct and significant imprints upon its character. The labor movement, therefore, is a product of its environment. It should be added, however, that the movement, in turn, has had an influence on its environment, in ways which will be made apparent in the chapters that follow. In the present chapter, stress will be placed on the former of these two relationships, namely, on the effect that environmental influences have had on the growth of the labor movement.1


The Beginnings

It has been said that the "primitive essence" of the labor movement in this country came over in the Mayflower.2 This statement is true enough if we follow the author, Mr. Woll, and make the essence sufficiently primitive. Mental attitudes which were later to play an important part in the formal beginning, and in the subsequent growth, of the American labor movement were certainly embedded in the minds of the Mayflower's passengers and safely transported across the Atlantic; but the first labor organizations, in the modern sense of the term, did not appear until long after the Mayflower reached these shores. They did not come into existence until near the end of the eighteenth century.

____________________
1
The first part of the present chapter contains little that is original. The factual information presented in it has been taken largely from the following old and well-known books. Mary Beard, A Short History of the American Labor Movement. New York: Harcourt, Brace & Howe, 1920; Selig Perlman, A History of Trade Unionism in the United States. New York: The Macmillan Co., 1922; J. R. Commons and associates, History of Labor in the United States. Vol. I. New York: The Macmillan Co., 1918.
2
M. Woll, Labor, Industry and Government, p. 1. New York: D. Appleton-Century Co., Inc., 1935.

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Unionism in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 528

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.