Contemporary Unionism in the United States

By Clyde E. Dankert | Go to book overview

3
A Review of American Trade Union History (2)

World War I and Its Aftermath

DURING THE PERIOD from 1915 to 1920, membership in the American Federation of Labor more than doubled, rising from 1,946,000 to 4,079,000. This phenomenal growth reflects the great increase that took place in industrial activity and the very favorable position that labor occupied, for both economic and political reasons, during the period. The A.F. of L. and the Railroad Brotherhoods, which together constituted almost the entire labor movement, gave their whole-hearted support to the war effort, asking in return, however, that certain labor standards be maintained and that labor be represented on the various boards then being established. Both of these requests were granted; standards were set up and representation given. Samuel Gompers was appointed to an important advisory post in connection with the Council of National Defense, and labor representatives sat on both the National War Labor Board and the War Labor Policies Board.

Despite joint labor-management representation on these boards and the urgent need of increasing production, industrial peace was not maintained. In both 1917 and 1918 more than a million workers were involved in strikes. From experiences in World War I and World War II, it is abundantly clear that the complete cessation of industrial strife, even under the stress of great national emergencies, is too much to expect.

Post-war developments. For about two years after the ending of the war in 1918 the American labor movement continued to expand. During these years the A.F. of L. increased its membership by approximately 1,358,000. At its convention in 1920 it reported a total membership of more than 4,000,000, a figure which had never before been approached and which was not to be surpassed until 1940. The growth of the labor movement during this period was significant not only because of its numerical extent but also because it involved union progress in occupations which formerly had not been organized.

During 1919 a wave of serious strikes swept the country. Among the more notable of the stoppages were: the Boston Police Strike, in connection with

-38-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Unionism in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 528

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.