Contemporary Unionism in the United States

By Clyde E. Dankert | Go to book overview

27
Unionism and the General Welfare

ACCOMPANYING the very large amount of descriptive and analytical detail concerning American unionism presented in the preceding chapters there has been a certain amount of objective appraisal. In addition to viewing union policies and practices in terms of their inherent characteristics and their effects on the unions themselves, we have given some attention to the effects of these policies and practices on society at large. So far, however, we have made no attempt to discuss in a broad and systematic fashion the social implications of unionism. In brief, we have not studied unionism against the background of the public good.


The General Welfare

General welfare versus group welfare. Before proceeding with the task of appraisal, there are two simple but highly important principles or truths that should be noted. The first of these is that the welfare of society as a whole transcends the welfare of any group or person in society.1 This principle can be reduced to the elementary idea that the whole of anything is greater than any of its parts. The truth of this general contention is easily grasped and readily granted when disreputable social groups are thought of--groups of, say, racketeers and gangsters. But it is easily overlooked or disregarded when more respectable groups are involved--business men, farmers, workers. Yet the welfare of society is of greater significance than the welfare of any one of these groups.

This does not mean, of course, that there is any necessary conflict between group (or individual) welfare and social welfare. In fact, the present eco-

____________________
1
In the present discussion the welfare of "society" will be interpreted in terms of American society, that is, in terms of the welfare of all the people in the United States. To study the effects of American unionism on people in general all over the world would take us too far afield. Moreover, it is doubtful if it would add much of value to the general treatment since there is a strong likelihood that the effects of American unionism on the welfare of the people in this country will be much the same as the effects on people the world over. The direction of the effects will certainly be the same, although their degree may be different.

-485-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Contemporary Unionism in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 528

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.