Gericault: Drawings & Watercolors

By Thaeodore Gaericault; Klaus Berger | Go to book overview

BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES
1791, September 26 Jean Louis André Théodore Géricault born in Rouen, son of a wealthy
lawyer.
The family moves to Paris.
1801Death of his mother.
1808-1810Studies painting with Carle Vernet, making frequent visits to the Louvre;
is specially attracted by the works of Rubens.
1810-1811Studies with Pierre Guérin, the David pupil.
1812His first painting, Cavalry Officer on Horseback exhibited in the Salon.
1814 The Wounded Cuirasseer exhibited in the Salon.
During the Hundred Days Géricault enlists with the Bourbon musketeers,
but after a short time he leaves the army.
1815The gayest months of his life with the group of artists, writers and former
Napoleonic officers, in Horace Vernet's studio in Montmartre. Géricault
becomes a liberal. He leaves Paris because of an unhappy love affair. End
of his first creative period.
Spring 1816to Spring 1817In Florence and Rome. Here Michelangelo is his strongest inspiration. He
goes to see Ingres and is delighted with his drawings. He makes many
studies for Wild Horse Race.
Spring 1817to Spring 1820Back in France. First lithographs. He spends many months working on The
Raft of the Medusa which is exhibited in the Salon of 1819. This work, be-
cause it implied a severe criticism of the Bourbon Restoration, provokes a
political scandal. The government, however, "to improve his ideas" gives
him a commission for a religious painting. Géricault, in turn, assigns the
project to his protégé, the young Delacroix.
Spring 1820to Spring 1822 Géricault's stay in England, where The Raft of the Medusa is shown around
the country for the price of admission. This enterprise brings him 17,000
gold francs. He makes many lithographs, he paints The Derby at Epsom.
In the Fall of 1820 he goes to visit Louis David, exiled in Brussels.
Spring 1822to Spring 1823 Géricault returns to Paris and looses a great deal of money through bank
speculations. He does a series of portraits of insane people from the Sal-
pétrière asylum. He has three riding accidents which leave him a complete
invalid, February 1823.
1824, January 18Dies as a result of his injuries.

-19-

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Gericault: Drawings & Watercolors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • I 5
  • II 10
  • Gericault Exhibitions Since 1924 18
  • Biographical Notes 19
  • Short Bibliography 20
  • Catalogue 22
  • Plates *
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