Gericault: Drawings & Watercolors

By Thaeodore Gaericault; Klaus Berger | Go to book overview

CATALOGUE
1 ITALIAN LANDSCAPE

Pen with blue and brown wash over black chalk on white paper; 232 × 207 mm.

Collections: Mathey; Duc de Trévise; Gobin; Paul Sachs; Fogg Museum of Art.

Bibliography: Clément, Géricault, no. 5 of the catalogue.

Drawings in the Fogg Museum of Art by Mongan and Sachs, 1940, no. 692 (reproduced).

Catalogue of the Duc de Trévise Collection Sale, Paris, Charpentier, May 19, 1938, no. 18 (reproduced).

Bryan Holme, Master Drawings, New York, 1943, no. 98 (reproduced).

Exhibited: Géricault Exhibition, Gobin, Paris, 1935, no. 28.

Géricault Exhibition, Bernheim-Jeune, Paris, 1937, no. 92.

Brooklyn Museum, 1939.

As pointed out in the Fogg Catalogue, this drawing belongs in Géricault's earliest period, 1810- 1812. The Louvre, then called Napoleon Museum, presented the art works of all schools and epochs in greater variety than any other gallery at any time. Here Géricault studied preferably the masters of the seventeenth century, and a landscape by Gaspard Poussin, called le Gaspre, might well have suggested this drawing. The loose combination of planes and groups are an indication of Géricault's pre- Roman style.

2 AN OFFICER OF THE CARABINEERS

Pen and ink with watercolor; 390 × 310 mm.

Collections: His de Lasalle; Louvre.

Bibliography: Clément, Géricault, no. 27 of the catalogue.

J. Guiffrey and P. Marcel, Inventaire gén- éral illustré des dessins du Louvre et du Musée de Versailles. Ecole française, V. 5.

Exhibited: Géricault Exhibition, Bernheim- Jeune, Paris, 1937.

Masterpieces of French Art, Art Institute, Chicago, 1941; no. 210.

As listed by Clément, this work was done between the two well-known paintings, the Officer of the Rifle Corps (Chasseurs) ( 1812) and the Wounded Cuirassier ( 1814).

The same officer of the carabineers appears in two fine paintings, one in the Louvre and the other in the Rouen Museum.

Mr. Walter Pach of New York also owns an oil study of a man with the same features.

This drawing is quite representative of the "Napoleonic" period and a very finished piece: rich use of color and wash, but subordinated to a definite outline and to a vision in planes.

3 NAPOLEONIC ARMY COACH

Ink and sepia on light buff paper; 248 × 180 mm; signed.

Collections: Léon Heiman; Art Institute of Chicago, Joseph Brooks Fair Memorial Collection.

Exhibited: Drawings Old and New, Art Institute, Chicago, 1946, no. 22 (reproduced in the catalogue).

This sketch, although not among the nineteen oil studies and drawings with military scenes which Clément lists for the years 1812- 1814, was probably done during that same period. It is interesting as a hasty first impression not yet having undergone the process of unification of the outlines. The most executed figure, to speak with Clément, "still contains a little of Carle Vernet's manner."

4 FRIGHTENED HORSE

Pen and ink and sepia wash on gray paper; 228 × 266 mm.

Hitherto unpublished.

Collections: J. Peoli; Detroit Institute of Arts.

5 HORSES AND RIDERS

Pen and ink on gray paper; 228 × 313 mm. (verso of plate 4).

Hitherto unpublished.

-22-

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Gericault: Drawings & Watercolors
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • I 5
  • II 10
  • Gericault Exhibitions Since 1924 18
  • Biographical Notes 19
  • Short Bibliography 20
  • Catalogue 22
  • Plates *
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