English Bards and Grecian Marbles: The Relationship between Sculpture and Poetry Especially in the Romantic Period

By Stephen A. Larrabee | Go to book overview

LIST OF CRITICAL TERMS

Since the use of several words which are commonly employed with a variety of meanings is unavoidable in this book, I wish to indicate the sense in which they appear here. This list need not be memorized or even consulted to enjoy the book. Still, it may prove useful to students of the terminology of criticism.

ROMANTIC. A chronological term referring to the years commonly thought of as "The Romantic Revival" or "Movement," roughly from 1798 ( Lyrical Ballads) to 1832 (death of Sir Walter Scott). In short, "Romantic" is a synonym and an abbreviation for "belonging to the first third of the nineteenth century."

"ROMANTIC." "Sharing, or possessing, or characterized by the distinctive traits, qualities, and beliefs of writers and thinkers of the Romantic period." Thus, a "romantic" poet, in contrast to "academic" writers who followed the standards of the Academies or to "classicists" devoted to the Ancients, was one who consciously (or, perhaps, unconsciously) concerned himself with expressing the spirit of the age. He found the inner or essential spirit of the early nineteenth century by a thorough examination of, or an imaginative participation in, its activities and thoughts. A "romantic" poet shared all four "ideals" which Professor Arthur O. Lovejoy has termed the "essentials of the aesthetic creed of Romanticism" ( 'Nature' as an Aesthetic Norm, MLN, XLIII [ 1927], 450). A fifth "ideal"--Professor Lovejoy 'Nature' in sense t--also belongs to the aesthetic creed of the English poets treated in this study. This is the "ideal" of "Naturgefühl; expression of emotions derived from the contemplation of the sensible world external to man [including works of art, such as statues], especially when this is conceived as a source of moral teaching or as a manifestation of, or means of contact with, some pervasive spiritual Presence . . . but the function of the artist is here conceived to be, not 'imitating' the external world [not describing with factual or informational details], but expressing his subjective response [giving his impressions or sensations] to it or interpreting its supposed inner meaning." See Chapter I, above, pp. 9-10.

ACADEMIC. A chronological term referring to the second half of the eighteenth century. Though Academies of the arts and sciences had

-289-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
English Bards and Grecian Marbles: The Relationship between Sculpture and Poetry Especially in the Romantic Period
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vi
  • Contents xi
  • Contents xiii
  • I. Poets and Sculpture 1
  • Ii. the Early Poets 18
  • III- the Seventeenth Century Pre-Restoration: the Uses Of Statue-Craft 43
  • Iv. the Eighteenth Century 66
  • V. Blake 99
  • VI- Wordsworth And Coleridge 120
  • VII- Byron Byron and Art 149
  • VIII- Shelley Greece: "The Crystalline Sea Of Thought" 175
  • IX- Keats Keats, the "Greek" 204
  • X. Landor and Hunt 233
  • Xi. the Lesser Poets 257
  • Xii. Conclusion 277
  • List of Critical Terms 289
  • A Selective Bibliography 293
  • Index 299
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 314

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.