followed the lad back to the town, but Indian squaws had hidden him and he could not be found.

The news that their son was really alive, although unwilling to return, cheered the father and mother. Accompanied by Baker, Ingles immediately set out himself to persuade the youngster to come home. They went through the Valley of Virginia by Staunton to Winchester, by Fort Cumberland to Fort Pitt, and down the Ohio to the Scioto village. When they arrived, they found the boy had gone to Detroit with an Indian party, so they had to wait several weeks for his return.

It was a strange meeting of father and son. Knowing no words in common they could not talk to each other. The lad, now seventeen, was tall and straight. His feet were small and terribly disfigured because as a little boy he had stepped into some coals of fire in an Indian camp. He had known no father except the brave who had adopted him, but something in the warmth and kindliness of the middle-aged white man who looked upon him so tenderly, flowed into his own wild, primitive heart. Yes, he would go back to the white settlements with the man who said he was his real father. Another ransom of a hundred and fifty dollars was paid to his Indian godfather and friend, and Ingles and Baker set off for home with their strange charge.

Mary Ingles took her long-lost son into her home by the side of the Wilderness Road and taught him the ways of the white people. She understood and tolerated his moods, when he would take his bow and arrow and go off into the woods and stay for days. Finally she sent him to their old family friend, Dr. Thomas Walker, in Albemarle County, where he was put in school. His rescue from a savage life brought a measure of solace, but she never ceased to be haunted by the memory of the baby she had left in a bark cradle in the Kentucky wilderness. She never saw or heard of it again.

1
It is believed that Ingles and Draper sounded out the Cherokee on the possibility of giving aid to the colonists against the Shawnee.
2
Mrs. Ingles was the first white woman of record to visit the Kentucky land.
3
F. B. Fitzpatrick, History. o! Ingles Ferry (MS. in Library of State Teachers College, East Radford, Virginia).

-66-

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