At last their fiendish task was over. The savages gathered up the plunder and disappeared. They took Charles forty miles into the mountains. When two warriors quarreled over who should own him, a chief settled the argument by splitting the Negro's head open with a tomahawk.

After the Indians had gone, Adam came out if his hiding place. He set off to find the Russell camp, got lost and wandered eight days before he was found. Crabtree, in the meantime, carried the news back to the Russell party and a runner was sent ahead to inform Boone. Russell hurried to the scene, prepared graves for the mangled bodies, then followed the trail of the raiders. After several miles he abandoned the chase as futile.

At the plundered camp the two parties united sorrowfully to bury these first victims in the effort to settle Kentucky. Rebecca provided a clean linen sheet to wrap around the body of her son. The graves were filled. Dirt was packed down hard and stones were piled on top to protect the bodies from ravenous wolves.6

The party held a consultation. Should they go on or turn back? Perhaps the Indians whom they thought at peace were again on the warpath. Perhaps there were other bands roving along the trail ahead. Only Boone wanted to proceed. Determined and stoic, he hated to admit defeat. Perhaps it was his own good judgment which caused him to give up; perhaps it was the reproachful eyes of grief-stricken Rebecca. He yielded and they returned to the Holston settlements. Daniel and his broken family were given shelter in a cabin of Captain David Gass near a newly established station on Clinch River, the present site of Castlewood, Virginia. His time for claiming the Kentucky paradise was not yet.

1
The creeks are located in Lee County, Virginia, and Harlan County, Kentucky. Walden's name is variously spelled Walden, Walding, Wallins. Walden's relatives and descendants are legion in East Tennessee. Like Boone, Walden later moved to Missouri where he died.
2
The river is now erroneously spelled " Dix River," the form adopted in recent years.
3
This was the last permanent settlement of any Indian tribe in Kentucky. The Shawnee shortly after moved to their Scioto towns.
4
Martin found the Cherokee hostile and abandoned the settlement after crops

-80-

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