fort. Henderson opened the convention with a pompous address.

In rounded phrases and a flourish of oratory, he told the assembled throng: "You, perhaps, are fixing the palladium, or placing the first corner-stone of an edifice, the height and magnificence of whose superstructure is now in the womb of futurity and can become great and glorious in proportion to the excellence of its foundation." He called for the establishment of courts and tribunals, that the new colony might be ruled with justice and freedom for its citizens. Laws were to be enacted by the settlers but the right of veto was reserved for the proprietors of Transylvania.

Committees were appointed, bills drafted, read and passed. Courts were established, and laws were enacted to regulate the militia, preserve game and provide for writs of attachment. Fees for clerks and sheriffs were named, and penalties were provided for profane swearing and Sabbath breaking. There were also laws for the punishment of criminals, for improving the breed of horses and for preserving the range. Thus Transylvania became a duly organized governmental unit.

On the last day of the proceedings, Colonel Henderson took part in a formality which typified his love of ceremony. Standing under the great elm, John Farrar, the attorney employed by the Indians, handed him a piece of the turf cut from the soil beneath them. While they both held it, Farrar declared his delivery of seisin and possession of the land, according to the terms of the title deed, which Henderson displayed. The immediate reading of the deed completed a legal requirement long obsolete. Then the convention adjourned, the delegates went back to their homes, and Colonel Henderson retired to his office, a proud and happy man.

However, other strong-willed pioneers with conflicting dreams for western development were pouring into Kentucky over Boone's road. These men were to figure largely in shaping the destiny of Transylvania.

1
Authorities do not agree when Boone entered the employ of Henderson. Dr. Archibald Henderson, of the University of North Carolina, descendant of the

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Wilderness Road
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 394

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.