in the house on the Road which he had defended so valiantly. Instead, he was buried where he fell, wrapped in his blanket.

1
Much of the information about the raids on the Wilderness Road is taken from Bayless Hardin, ed., "Whitley Papers," published in The Register of Kentucky State Historical Society, Vol. 36, No. 116, July 1958,190-209.
2
See "Tours into Kentucky and the Northwest Territory" by the Reverend James Smith of Powhatan County, Virginia, 1783- 1795- 1797, in Ohio Archaeological and Historical Quarterly, Vol. XVI, July 1907, 348-401. Smith in the journal of his trip in 1783 described Cumberland Gap: "This is a very noted place on account of the great number of people who have here unfortunately fallen a prey to savage cruelty or barbarity. The mountain in the gap is neither very steep nor high, but the almost inaccessible cliffs on either side the road render it a place peculiar for doing mischief."
3
Pewter plates, identified as belonging to the McNitt party, were discovered by a man some years ago while plowing in a field on the site of the tragedy. These are now preserved in Kentucky's Levi Jackson Wilderness State Park, and a marker has been erected at the scene of the "Last Supper." The graves of the victims are located in the park in an inclosure surrounded by a stone wall. These graves are the only ones preserved between Crab Orchard and Cumberland Gap of the hundreds killed along the road during the migration years.
4
Shelby Manuscripts, Fiison Club, Louisville, Kentucky.

-183-

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