steers . . . worth 40 dollars each, makes 9,440. Two or three thousand hogs, I hear, are on the road to be added to the above list . . . making in all, 777,067 in good money. I trust the time is not very distant when Kentucky will restore her credit and there will be no more relief measures prayed for, nor stop laws passed; which have so much disgraced one of the most prolific and rich states in the union, whose sons are bold and enterprising, beyond any, I believe in the world.

For 1825 Renfro reported that the value of livestock which passed south through his gate for southern markets was $905,892 and consisted of 4,019 horses, 1,019 mules, 63,036 hogs and 1,393. cattle. By 1828 he proudly reported that the value had passed the million mark, the total being $1,167,302, for 3,412 horses, 3,288 mules, 97,455 hogs, 2,141 sheep and 1,525 stall-fed beef cattle.

Farris, Renfro and other prominent leaders in the fast settling wilderness during the first quarter of the nineteenth century kept up a constant agitation for the improvement of the Wilderness Road. They hounded the legislature with appeals and usually got action. Scarcely a session of the legislature passed without some consideration of the Road's maintenance and management. The Kentucky statutes were filled with acts relating to bridges, ferries, repairs, improvements, regulation of tolls and methods of maintenance. Never satisfactory to the long-suffering travelers who passed over it, "the Wilderness Turnpike," as it was now called, continued a subject of debate, complaint and agitation.

1
Otto A. Rothert, The Outlaws of Cave.in-Rock ( Cleveland, 1924;) Robert M. Coates , The Outlaw Years ( New York, 1930).
2
The Journal of the Rev. Francis Asbury, Vols. I, II, III ( New York, 1821).
3
Letters on the Condition of Kentucky in 1825 ( New York, 1916). (Reprinted from the Richmond [Virginia] Enquirer and edited by Earl G. Swem).
4
This brick house at Cumberland Ford built for Shelby was the first in the wilderness. It stood until the Civil War when it was torn down and, according to tradition, hauled to Cumberland Gap by the Federal Forces under General George W. Morgan to be used in constructing military buildings. Shelby never lived at Cumberland Ford but owned property there for a number of years and was for a short time a partner in operating the ferry Dater taken over by Renfro. Renfro and a boy companion were killed by lightning July 29. 1835, while searching for Swift's silver mine.

-207-

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