tain wall, bringing news of persecutions in East Tennessee. Young men were being rounded up by Confederates as conscripts. Barns were stripped, homes pilfered, horses taken, and livestock slaughtered. Hotheaded mobs took advantage of the prevailing violence, and outlaws and bushwhackers unattached to either side killed and robbed.

The Tennesseans stationed along the Wilderness Road were at least a threat to the Confederates stationed at Cumberland Gap. The post became a dangerously exposed advanced sector of the long line after the Union conquest of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, and the occupation of Nashville. General Churchwell turned the command of the Gap garrison over to Colonel J. E. Rains and went to Knoxville as provost marshal for East Tennessee. Rains worried about Carter's men. He reported early in February that his force of two regiments of infantry, one battalion of cavalry and one company of artillery was in danger. Reinforcements of two regiments and six heavy pieces of artillery bolstered his defense.

Carter sent frequent scouting parties to the gates of Cumberland Gap, which spurred Rains in his preparations for an expected major attack. On March 21 Carter himself led a considerable force across Cumberland Ford into Yellow Creek Valley, where the gray lines at the mountain pass were plainly visible. His light artillery exchanged shots with the enemy, but little damage was done. After the tantalizing threat he withdrew until Buell could provide reinforcements for a stronger attacking force. The thrust through Cumberland Gap to sever the vital rail line serving the Confederacy, which he and Nelson had so eagerly planned, was stayed by the dead hand of inaction.

1
Carter Family Manuscripts, in possession of Mrs. J. Frank Seiler, Elizabethton, Tennessee.
2
Sketch of the Life of William Nelson (author unknown; Cincinnati, n. d.), p. 6.
3
For the official documents concerning the effort of the Unionists under Carter and Thomas to march upon East Tennessee during the fall of 1861, see The War of the Rebellion: a compilation of the Official Records ( Washington, D. C.), Series II, I, 823-931.

-236-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Wilderness Road
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 394

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.