Chapter 25
Streamlined for the Age of Speed

Among the new leaders cast up by the shifting tides in the Cumberlands during the nineties was Joe F. Bosworth, a young Lexington lawyer. He hurried along the Wilderness Road to the development in Yellow Creek Valley when it was still a city of tents. With more courage than caution and more optimism than good business sense, he rode out the storm while many disillusioned industrialists deserted Arthur's ship.

"It's all right, boys," young Bosworth would say when the days were darkest. "Things will come out all right. Let's stick with it." He bolstered the morale of his associates, and turned to the task of salvage and reconstruction. As his law practice did not take much of his time he entered politics. He was elected a member of the first city council when Middlesboro was incorporated March 20, 1890, and later was chosen police judge. He liked that. It was pleasant to be called "Judge" before he was out of his twenties, and to be sought for political favors. He dabbled in real estate, took long shots with paper investments and formed a partnership for the operation of a coal mine. As conditions stabilized, he began to prosper; by 1905 he was well on the way to a modest fortune.

Bosworth represented the new citizenship which came to the mountains with Arthur's development. The "outsiders" who remained after the reverses were absorbed and amalgamated with the natives into a more progressive type. The railroads had come to stay, and the coal and timber operations settled down to steady

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