The Measurement of Intelligence: An Explanation of and a Complete Guide for the Use of the Stanford Revision and Extension of the Binet-Simon Intelligence Scale

By Lewis M. Terman | Go to book overview

CHAPTER X
INSTRUCTIONS FOR YEAR IV

IV, 1. Comparison of lines

Procedure. Present the appropriate accompanying card with the lines in the horizontal position, and pointing to the top pair of lines say: "See these lines. Look closely and tell me which one is longer. Put your finger on the longest one." We use the superlative as well as the comparative form of long because it is often more familiar to young subjects. If the child does not respond, say: "Show me which line is the biggest." In the same way show the middle and lower pairs of lines, saying: "Which one is the longest here?"

Scoring. All three comparisons must be made corectly; or if only two responses out of three are correct, all three pairs are again shown, just as before, and if there is no error this time, the test is passed. The standard, therefore, is three correct responses out of three, or five out of six.

Sometimes the child points, but at no particular part of the card. In such cases it may be difficult to decide whether he has failed to comprehend and to make the discrimination or has only been careless in pointing. It is then necessary to repeat the experiment until the evidence is clear.

Remarks. As noted by Binet, success in this test depends on the comprehension of the verbal directions rather than on actual discrimination of length. The child who would unerringly choose the larger of two pieces of candy might

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