Red over Black: Black Slavery among the Cherokee Indians

By R. Halliburton Jr. | Go to book overview

Preface

Though it is small in size, this book has been several years in the making. Its genesis dates back to 1969 when I attended the dramatic presentation of the "Trail of Tears" at the outdoor TSA-LA-GI amphitheater in the Cherokee Cultural Complex near Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The work has grown to fruition through several research papers read at historical conventions and articles published in scholarly journals.

The Cherokee Indians are a proud and ancient people. Their history reaches far back beyond definitely calculated time to the ages when tradition fathered history. At one time the Cherokees had hoped to remain apart and aloof from the white man and his civilization. White explorers, traders, trappers, missionaries, road builders, and squatters rendered that wish impossible, however, and convinced the more progressive Cherokees that they had to adopt the white man's civilization in order to survive. This decision was not unanimous, however, and well before 1800 some tribesmen had moved to the trans-Mississippi West to escape the encroachment of the white man. The vast majority who remained in the East, however, succeeded exceedingly well in their acculturation--so well that they were visited by American and European whites curious to observe the cultural and ethnological phenomenon of the primitive "forest children" who were evolving into a civilized nation within the span of two generations.

Most Cherokees were cognizant of the efficacy of voluntary acculturation and quickly accepted the accouterments of European civilization, including the institution of black slavery. Nevertheless, as late as 1975 an adequate documented treatment of the subject had never appeared in print. Myriad volumes of monographs, textbooks, biographies, essays, anthologies, and other works treating the history of the American Indian and the Afro-American are rolling from the nation's presses in seemingly ever-increasing numbers. These works sometimes refer to the subject briefly (often obliquely) and usually provide misinformation and perpetuate long-accepted myths.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Red over Black: Black Slavery among the Cherokee Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Origins of Black Slavery in the Cherokee Country 3
  • Notes 16
  • 2 - Early Cherokee Planters and Plantations 20
  • Notes 29
  • 3 - Maturity and Westward Movement 32
  • Notes 46
  • 4 - The Last Decade in the East 50
  • Notes 59
  • 5 - The New Nation in the West 61
  • Notes 77
  • 6 - Great Runaway and Stricter Controls 80
  • Notes 91
  • 7 - Missionaries and Abolitionism 93
  • Notes 103
  • 8 - The Prewar Years 106
  • Notes 120
  • 9 - The Civil War 122
  • Notes 136
  • 10 - Conclusion 139
  • Appendix A 145
  • Appendix B 181
  • Appendix C - A Cherokee Adoption Rite 193
  • Notes 194
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 209
  • About the Author 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.