Red over Black: Black Slavery among the Cherokee Indians

By R. Halliburton Jr. | Go to book overview

Section 7 was amended to read:

All male citizens, who have attained the age of eighteen years, shall be deemed qualified electors of the Cherokee Nation, and there shall be no restrictions by law, save such as are required for persons convicted of crime, or for such limit as to residence, not exceeding six months in the district where the vote is offered, as may be required by census or registration.

Article VII was then appended and Section 1 read:

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, shall ever hereafter exist in the Cherokee Nation, otherwise than in the punishment of crime, whereof the party shall have been duly convicted; and any provision of the Constitution of the Cherokee Nation conflicting with the foregoing section, is hereby annulled.29

Cherokee slaves apparently were less cognizant that freedom would be a result of a Union victory than their southern counterparts. Many Cherokee slaves had been taken from the Nation to "safety," others had fled to freedom. Therefore, sizable numbers of freedmen were ignorant of the treaty clause which provided for their right of incorporation into the tribe if they returned within six months. Consequently, large numbers either did not return or returned too late to qualify for the benefits stipulated in the treaty. Refugee freedmen who returned after January 19, 1867, discovered that they were not citizens, but intruders.

Cherokee freedmen observed August 4 as the anniversary of their freedom. Emancipation actually occurred during February 1863, but for unknown reasons August 4 continues to be observed. Picnics, oratory, singing, and "bountiful repasts" have always been a part of the celebration observed across the old Cherokee Nation.30


NOTES
1.
H. M. Rector to John Ross, in The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 129 vols. ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1900), series I, vol. 13, pp. 490-491. Hereafter cited as Official Records.
2.
Ibid., pp. 491-492.

-136-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Red over Black: Black Slavery among the Cherokee Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - The Origins of Black Slavery in the Cherokee Country 3
  • Notes 16
  • 2 - Early Cherokee Planters and Plantations 20
  • Notes 29
  • 3 - Maturity and Westward Movement 32
  • Notes 46
  • 4 - The Last Decade in the East 50
  • Notes 59
  • 5 - The New Nation in the West 61
  • Notes 77
  • 6 - Great Runaway and Stricter Controls 80
  • Notes 91
  • 7 - Missionaries and Abolitionism 93
  • Notes 103
  • 8 - The Prewar Years 106
  • Notes 120
  • 9 - The Civil War 122
  • Notes 136
  • 10 - Conclusion 139
  • Appendix A 145
  • Appendix B 181
  • Appendix C - A Cherokee Adoption Rite 193
  • Notes 194
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 209
  • About the Author 219
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.