Woman's Work in the Civil War: A Record of Heroism, Patriotism and Patience

By L. P. Brockett; Mary C. Vaughan | Go to book overview

MRS. ISABELLA FOGG.

MAINE has given to the cause of the Union many noble heroes, brave spirits who have perilled life and health to put down the rebellion, and not a few equally brave and noble-hearted women, who in the ministrations of mercy have laid on the altar of patriotism their personal services, their ease and comfort, their health and some of them even life itself to bring healing and comfort to the defenders of their country. Among these, few, none perhaps save those who have laid down their lives in the service, are more worthy of honor than Mrs. Fogg.

The call for seventy-five thousand men to drive back the invaders and save the National Capital, met with no more hearty or patriotic responses than those that came from the extreme northeastern border of our Union, "away towards the sun-rising." Calais, in the extreme eastern part of Maine, raised its quota and more, upon the instant, and sent them forward promptly. The hearts of its women, too were stirred, and each was anxious to do something for the soldier. Mrs. Fogg felt that she was called to leave her home and minister in some way, she hardly knew how, to the comfort of those who were to fight the nation's battles. At that time, however, home duties were so pressing that, most reluctantly, she was compelled to give up for the time the purpose. Three months later came the seeming disaster, the real blessing in disguise, of Bull Run, and again was her heart moved, this time to more definite action, and a more determined purpose.

-505-

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