CHAPTER XVIII.
NATURE AND DIVISIONS OF IDEAL FEELING.

Ideal vs. Sensuous Feeling. Is there an inner, or feeling, side to the world of ideas? Are we sensible of degrees of feeling in the phases of the apperceptive process? The simple answer of consciousness is, yes; and there is opened before us the great class of feelings called ideal. Ideal feelings, therefore, are the modifications of sensibility which accompany the exercise of the apperceptive function.

Ideal feeling is then, as Hodgson says, a new kind of sensibility accompanying a now kind of nervous process. The apperceptive function has its organic basis in some kind of a brain process which represents the combining of special centers in the hemispheres and the dynamic union of their energies. If the function performed by the attention is new, so also are the modes of mental excitement which attach to its different phases.

Ideal Feelings as Special and Common. The analogy of sensuous feeling serves us to indicate another distinction. Besides certain special feelings--sensations--which are brought about by the exercise of particular organic functions, we found a great fund of common sensibility-- organic feeling--which seemed to belong to the living being as an organism. The motor feelings were found everywhere--the muscles being the most general outlet for the nervous process which brings feeling about. So upon an examination of the "feelings of ideas," we are able to make an analogous distinction. On the one side there are the special kinds of mental excitement, which are developed in connection with particular synthetic processes: memory yields regret, remorse, pride; imagination throws

-241-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elements of Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 384

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.