Rise of the New West, 1819-1829

By Frederick Jackson Turner | Go to book overview

INDEX
ADAMS, JOHN, and Miranda, 201; death, 306.
Adams, J. Q., as literary statesman, 25; on southern political genius, 65; and Oregon country, 127; political apprehensions ( 1850), 147; and Missouri struggle, 166, 169, 193; on slavery and secession, 169; political character and record as candidate, 177­ 180, 192-194, 256; plan of campaign, 194, 198; suspicious of Latin America, 204; first policy concerning, 204, 212; and British in Oregon, 207; and Russian claims, 208; and Cuba, 210, 282; and Monroe Doctrine, 217­ 221; and Greek independence, 218; southern support, 247; strength as candidate, 249-251; underrates Jackson's strength, 251; and caucus nomination, 253; and international regulation of slave-trade, 256; electoral vote, 259, 260; and Claycontrolled vote in House, 261; elected president by House,262-264; delicate position, 264, 266, 267; and corrupt-bargain cry, 267­ 270, 279; non-partisan cabinet, 271; refuses to build machine by patronage, 272­ 274; formation of opposition, 274; imprudent utterances on loose construction, 275-277; alienates south, 278; believed to favor emancipation, 279; opposition not united, 279; attempt to restrict patronage, 280; and Panama Congress, 281-285; union of opposition, 285; and internal improvements, 286, 294; begins Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, 291; and West Indian trade, 295; and Georgia - Creek affair, 310-312; and tariff of 1828, 317, 319­ 321; diary, 338.
Agriculture, New England, 14­ 16; southern unification, 56, 99; southern seaboard decline, 57-59, 61, 325; western, 101. See also Cotton.
Alabama admitted, 160. See also Southwest, West.
Alleghany Mountains, influence on history, 224. Amelia Island affair, 203.
American Fur Company, activity, 113, 120. American system. See Internal improvements, Tariff.
Aristocracy, character of Virginia, 59-61; of South Carolina, 63.
Arkansas, territorial government and slavery, 156.
Ashley, W. H., and western furtrade, 119-121.

-353-

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